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Washington lawmakers consider adding the option to not be either female or male to birth certificates.

Washington lawmakers consider adding the option to not be either female or male to birth certificates.

In Washington state, something as simple as your gender on a driver’s license may be getting more complicated. Traditionally, an ID card or license will have basic information about the person. This includes things like weight, height, and hair color. It also includes a simple “M” or “F” for male or female. This gender marker comes via the very first official document each of us gets, the birth certificate. Now all of the sudden, there might just be a new option for gender. Washington is ready for residents to opt out of being either male or female, but instead simply “X.”

The “X” would allow an individual to say they do not feel like they are either male or female, regardless of their physical body. This new third gender, or perhaps a lack of sex, push a liberal agenda instead of the core need to identify individuals by gender. According to a recent article about this state wide initiative:

“The Washington state Department of Health filed a proposal that would allow people to change the gender on their birth certificates to neither male nor female.
The clinical term for this is non-binary, but is better known as gender X.
According to the Department of Health, people born in Washington can currently request a new birth certificate with a different gender than the one on their original.
The state is taking the first steps of proposing a non-binary option for people who don’t identify as male or female.
The Health Department filed the to put the process in motion August 22.
The state of Oregon became the first state to offer the third gender option on driver’s licenses in July.”

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Washington state records could change very soon.

Washington state records could change very soon.

Within a liberal state like either Oregon or Washington, there is already a large amount of attention paid to things like transgender rights. We see trans-men having babies and held out as being a new breed of heroes. We also see a high amount of press tied to respecting one’s gender pronouns and various other awkward parts of the trans movement. The new addition of the letter “X” to the discussion of gender seems to take this one step further

Someone who has decided they are neither female or male is not the same as being transgendered. This is when a person is born one gender but feels this was an error. They identify as the opposite gender than what their body appears and often make some effort to correct this on their own. This may include simply dressing as the opposite gender or going further with corrective surgery to transform into their correct gender.

This is different than someone who just sees themselves as not fitting into either gender. They are not seeking to correct being born in the wrong body but instead not willing to commit to either gender. They were in fact born one or the other but somehow do not feel that applies to their specific case.

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For the majority of us, gender is a part of who we are. It probably has never occurred to you to simply decide you are not either gender; it just was not ever an option. Is this something new that pushes everyone to see liberals as an individual as we can no longer even use gender to group them. It seems this is just one step to appease the snowflake mentality.

Examples of those who say they are "X".

Examples of those who say they are “X”.

To understand the “X” issue, perhaps it will help to explore what gender non-binary means. According to a recent report about this emerging group:

“Genderqueer (GQ), also termed non-binary (NB), is a catch-all category for gender identities that are not exclusively masculine or feminine‍—‌identities which are thus outside the gender binary and cisnormativity.[1] Genderqueer people may express a combination of masculinity and femininity, or neither, in their gender expression.
Androgynous (also androgyne) is frequently used as a descriptive term for people in this category. However, not all persons identify as androgynous. Genderqueer people may identify as either having an overlap of, or indefinite lines between, gender identity; having two or more genders (being bigender, trigender, or pangender); having no gender (being agender, nongendered, genderless, genderfree or neutrois); moving between genders or having a fluctuating gender identity (genderfluid); or being third gender or other-gendered, a category which includes those who do not place a name to their gender.”

With this definition of NB, it seems that now we must worry if the “X” is just the start of an on slot of new gender categories. It seems confusing to say someone is trigender when technically there are only two genders? Is it possible to be male, female and an “X”?