AOC Plays Victim

PUBLISHED: 4:04 PM 28 Jul 2021

Veritas Finds ‘Unreleased’ CNN Doc of AOC Comparing Jan 6 To Sexual Assault

But… she’s a victim…

What a joke. (Source: YouTube Screenshot)

Not only is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez woefully ignorant and some claim irretrievably stupid, she’s also apparently a victim in her own mind. Or, at least, that’s what she told CNN in a documentary about January 6, which never aired.

Project Veritas got a copy and reported:

  • Dana Bash, CNN Anchor and Chief Political Correspondent: “You’re now in your second term in the House, you have 12 million Twitter followers, nine million Instagram followers, and they all know you by three letters: AOC. So, what’s it like to be AOC?”
  • Bash: “What’s it like to be one of the most famous politicians in America, to be both adored and reviled with seemingly equal passion, and to be known by just three letters?”
  • Bash: “When I was your age, I was trying to fit into the world as it is, not trying to change it. Where do you get that confidence?”
  • Bash: “Being Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez means defying expectations.”
  • Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: “After the [January Sixth] attack, I hid behind my door…I just hear, ‘Where is she? Where is she?’ This was the moment where I thought everything was over.”
  • Ocasio-Cortez: “I’m a survivor of sexual assault. I haven’t told many people that in my life.”
  • Ocasio-Cortez: “For a lot of [sexual assault] survivors across the country, the decision to come forward oftentimes does not feel like a conscious one. That impact was doubled that day because of the misogyny and the racism that was so deeply rooted and animated — that attack on the Capitol, you know, white supremacy and patriarchy are very linked in a lot of ways. There’s a lot of sexualizing of that violence.”
  • Ocasio-Cortez: “I think especially when it comes to women in politics, you’re always being picked apart for even the very small aesthetic decisions that you make.”

[WASHINGTON, D.C. – July 27, 2021] Project Veritas published a new video today of an unreleased CNN documentary that features Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez describing her life experiences and political career.

CNN anchor and chief political correspondent, Dana Bash, interviewed Ocasio-Cortez and appeared to ask what many may consider to be “softball questions.”

Bash: “You’re now in your second term in the House, you have 12 million Twitter followers, nine million Instagram followers, and they all know you by three letters: AOC. So, what’s it like to be AOC?”

Ocasio-Cortez: “Um, you know, it’s, uh, it’s an interesting question because I just feel like I really try to be is — to be like my neighbors and to be, um, like the folks at the bodega that I get coffee from.”

Bash: “How are you most misunderstood?”

Ocasio-Cortez: “Just — thinking that I’m rash, unintelligent, and that I intend to do harm. I think that particularly the misperception that I’m here to do harm to our country, it’s unfortunate.”

Bash asked Ocasio-Cortez about her experience during the events of January 6.

“After the attack, I hid behind my door…I just hear, ‘Where is she? Where is she?’ This was the moment where I thought everything was over,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

Ocasio-Cortez went on to tie her alleged personal “sexual assault” experience with what happened on January 6.

“I’m a survivor of sexual assault. I haven’t told many people that in my life,” she said.

“For a lot of survivors across the country, the decision to come forward oftentimes does not feel like a conscious one. That impact was doubled that day because of the misogyny and the racism that was so deeply rooted and animated — that attack on the Capitol, you know, white supremacy and patriarchy are very linked in a lot of ways. There’s a lot of sexualizing of that violence.”

Bash followed up with Ocasio-Cortez after this statement, asking if she was afraid of being “raped” and killed on January 6. Ocasio-Cortez responded in the affirmative.

Also, during the interview, Bash and Ocasio-Cortez discussed the alleged adversity and advantages that “confident women” deal with in Washington D.C.

Bash: “You talked about being a woman, you sometimes take heat for your celebrity status for being glamorous. One thing that you said that really struck me is femininity has power. What do you mean by that?”

Ocasio-Cortez: “I think especially when it comes to women in politics, you’re always being picked apart for even the very small aesthetic decisions that you make.”

Bash: “You embrace the power.”

Ocasio-Cortez: “Yeah. Yeah.”

Bash: “How do you use that power? The power of femininity as you describe it?”

Ocasio-Cortez: “We’re really taught to shy away from embracing femininity and the way that I think — when we embrace it, we say power.”