Malaria Drug Works!

PUBLISHED: 5:45 PM 3 Jul 2020

Trump Vindicated Again: Study Shows Hydroxychloroquine Works To Stop COVID Death

Yet again, Americans have been lied to by so called government ‘experts.’

So it does work... just like many experts said. (Source: Sci Show YouTube Screenshot)

In an interesting release, a new study has shown that the malaria drug touted by President Trump DOES actually reduce fatalities associated with COVID-19.

Just The News reported:

The anti-malaria drug that President Trump touted as a possible treatment for coronavirus, hydroxychloroquine, successfully lowered the death rate among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the most recent study of the drug.

The large-scale analysis, conducted by Henry Ford Health System, was published Thursday in the peer-reviewed International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

The study examined 2,541 patients who had been hospitalized in six hospitals between March 10 and May 2, 2020.

More than twenty-six percent (26.4%) of patients who did not receive hydroxychloroquine died.

But among those who received hydroxychloroquine, fewer than half that number — 13% — died.

More than 90% of the patients received hydroxychloroquine within 48 hours of admission to the hospital. Scientists say giving the drug early during illness may be a key to success.

The study’s authors also found one concern flagged in previous reports about hydroxychloroquine did not materialize: heart-related adverse events.

“The data here is clear that there was benefit to using [hydroxychloroquine] as a treatment for sick, hospitalized patients,” said Dr. Steven Kalkanis of Henry Ford Health System.

The study scientists point out that other reports about hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for coronavirus that had less positive, mixed, or negative results studied different populations; administered hydroxychloroquine later during illness; used different doses, and/or were not peer-reviewed.

President Trump was widely criticized in the media for saying that if hydroxychloroquine proves to work in treating coronavirus, it could be a game changer.

In May, he told reporters that he, himself, took a course of the drug as a preventive measure after several White House officials were diagnosed with Covid-19. Trump says he suffered no ill effects from hydroxychloroquine.

Henry Ford Health System is also studying 3,000 healthcare and frontline workers to see if hydroxychloroquine can prevent coronavirus. That study is titled: “Will Hydroxychloroquine Impede or Prevent COVID-19” or “WHIP COVID-19.”

However, the study scientists say negative publicity and safety concerns about hydroxychloroquine — some of which they say is inaccurate or out of context — has made it difficult to recruit enough volunteers to take part.

“Currently, the drug should be used only in hospitalized patients with appropriate monitoring, and as part of study protocols, in accordance with all relevant federal regulations,” says Dr. Marcus Zervos, co-author of study.

Dozens of drugs are currently under study as possible treatments for coronavirus and multiple potential vaccines are in development.

Cardiologist Dr. William O’Neill, a medical director at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan, first spoke with “Full Measure” about the study while it was underway in May.

Detroit News reported:

Officials with the Michigan health system said the study found the drug “significantly” decreased the death rate of patients involved in the analysis.

“As doctors and scientists, we look to the data for insight,” said Steven Kalkanis, CEO of the Henry Ford Medical Group. “And the data here is clear that there was a benefit to using the drug as a treatment for sick, hospitalized patients.”

The study, published in the International Society of Infectious Disease, found patients did not suffer heart-related side effects from the drug.

Patients with a median age of 64 were among those analyzed, with 51% men and 56% African American. Roughly 82% of the patients began receiving hydroxychloroquine within 24 hours and 91% within 48 hours, a factor Dr. Marcus Zervos identified as a potential key to the medication’s success.

“We attribute our findings that differ from other studies to early treatment, and part of a combination of interventions that were done in supportive care of patients, including careful cardiac monitoring,” said Zervos, division head of infectious disease for the health system who conducted the study with epidemiologist Dr. Samia Arshad.

Other studies, Zervos noted, included different populations or were not peer-reviewed.

“Our dosing also differed from other studies not showing a benefit of the drug,” he said. “We also found that using steroids early in the infection associated with a reduction in mortality.”

Henry Ford Health has been working on multiple clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine, including one that is testing whether the drug can prevent COVID-19 infections in first responders who work with coronavirus patients. The first responder clinical trial was trumpeted by Trump administration officials early in the pandemic.

Many health care institutions, including the World Health Organization, suspended clinical trials of the drug touted by President Donald Trump after a faulty study was published in the British medical journal The Lancet on May 22. The WHO restarted the trials in June.

The study is vital, Zervos said, as medical workers prepare for a possible second wave of the virus and there is plenty of research that still needs to be conducted to solidify an effective treatment.