Clinton Set Up?

PUBLISHED: 10:56 PM 14 Aug 2018

Trump Tower Meeting Engineered By Clinton Campaign

The June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower seems to have been put together by Glenn Simpson of Fusion GPS using a Russian client as bait. No matter what was said at the gathering, the damage was done by setting the meeting up.

Previous clues indicating the infamous Trump Tower meeting in June of 2016 was a “sting” engineered between Hillary Clinton’s Campaign and the Department of Justice, have been corroborated by newly surfacing evidence.

“Why would Moscow need to send a Russian lawyer who didn’t speak English to Trump Tower?” Former FBI agent Mark Wauck asked RealClearInvestigations. “That tends to confirm that the meeting was intended as a setup.” The real conspiracy to collude with Russians may have been the arrangement of the meeting itself, according to some.

Previous clues indicating the infamous Trump Tower meeting in June of 2016 was a “sting” engineered between Hillary Clinton’s Campaign and the Department of Justice, have been corroborated by newly surfacing evidence.

According to Christopher Steele’s dossier, candidate Donald Trump, Paul Manafort, and Carter Page, “were in clandestine contact” with the Russian government… supposedly. “If that was really the case, it’s not clear why the Russian government needed a British music publicist to make an overture,” the ex-agent also points out.

Congressional testimony confirms that consultant Glenn Simpson, founder of Fusion GPS, was hired by Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee to work his “political opposition” magic against President Trump.

Simpson has testified he put former MI-6 agent Christopher Steele on the job and sent him to Russia. Simpson and Steele both kept a constant back channel to Bruce Ohr, the fourth-highest ranking member of the Department of Justice, as recently declassified messages prove.

Ohr, who’s wife Nellie Ohr worked for Fusion GPS right alongside Simpson, “coordinated before, during and after the election” with both Christopher Steele and Glenn Simpson.

Also, Hillary Clinton wasn’t Simpson’s only employer.

The night before the Trump Tower meeting, Simpson had dinner with another client, Natalia Veselnitskaya. He had dinner with her again the night after the meeting, he told Congress.

Together, they were working on a lobbying campaign for the benefit of Pyotr Katsyv and his son Denis. Both businessmen were allegedly tied to the Kremlin and had run into trouble with a new law established in 2012 called the “Magnitsky act,” referring to a man who died while in Russian police custody.

RCI insists they have “sources” verifying Simpson “was tasked with running a smear campaign against the driving force behind those sanctions, Chicago-born financier William Browder.” Browder was the man who employed Magnitsky.

As RCI reports, unaware of the Trump Tower meeting, Browder “was so concerned about Fusion GPS’s work on behalf of Russian interests that in July 2016, he lodged a complaint with the DOJ against both Simpson and Akhmetshin, for failing to properly register as foreign agents while working for the Russian government.”

Steele was working for Russian aluminum tycoon Oleg Deripaska at the same time he was on Simpson’s payroll, trying to get Deripaska’s visa reinstated.

When Christopher Steele was “dismissed by the FBI for speaking to the press, Bruce Ohr took over the work of relaying Fusion GPS’ opposition research on the Trump campaign directly to the FBI,” RCI and others report.

To get the attention of the Trump campaign, RCI’s investigation revealed “FBI confidential sources and other figures associated with Western intelligence services and the Clinton campaign approached the Trump team promising damaging information on Clinton.”

There was more than one attempt but only one sounded promising enough to set up a meeting over. Rob Goldstone, a British music publicist emailed Donald Trump Jr. promising “official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and would be very useful to your father.”

The language was very carefully crafted, RCI highlights. “The specificity of the phrasing in Goldstone’s email appears designed to establish the case for collusion: ‘This is obviously very high level and sensitive information but is part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.’”

Once she got there, Veselnitskaya knew nothing about Hillary Clinton. “The senior Trump campaign officials were disappointed to find out that she wanted to talk about Browder and his associates.”

More than two years later, “no evidence has emerged from the meeting of any dark conspiracy,” RCI writes. All it took was holding the meeting in the first place, “appearances were evidently enough.” One congressional investigator explained to RCI “the purpose of the meeting was to substantiate the Clinton-funded dossier alleging that Trump was taking dirt on his rivals from the Russians.”

During his Senate testimony, Simpson alleged that the meeting backed up one of Steele’s key claims. “Trump and his inner circle have accepted a regular flow of intelligence from the Kremlin, including on his Democratic and other political rivals.” Simpson carefully tried to engineer that but didn’t necessarily pull it off.

Simpson testified under oath he “had no knowledge of the meeting with Donald Trump Jr. and others until it was reported a year later.” Recent evidence suggests he may have perjured himself.

He met both before and after the meeting with one of it’s principals, Natalia Veselnitskaya, who already publicly admitted that “she used talking points developed by Simpson” during the meeting. The Kremlin corroborates that statement on their Prosecutor General’s website, RCI reports.

Russian-American lobbyist Rinat Akhmetshin also went to the meeting. He once served in the counterintelligence service for the Soviet Union and could possibly be the “Russian intelligence officer” that Simpson mentioned to Bruce Ohr in a December 2016 email.

“Much of the collection about the Trump campaign ties to Russia comes from a former Russian intelligence officer (? not entirely clear) who lives in the U.S.)”