No English At Home

PUBLISHED: 8:12 PM 19 Sep 2018

Nearly Half Of Homes In Major Cities Do Not Speak English

These numbers are vastly different in more rural areas.

While many may argue that one should have to stop being true to their roots, at what point is the mean of "being American" being blurred, some people ask.

According to most historians, a nation’s language is not only as important as it’s culture, but it also helps to define the culture. Jokes, memes, and pop references all play a role, as do other aspects. With that in mind, some people have found it quite alarming that nearly half of those living the five biggest cities in the United States of America do not speak English in the home, according to the Washington Examiner.

The Census Bureau has shown what “the impact of a decade of soft immigration policies” has turned out to be, the outlet has written. The bureau has found that “a record 67 million do not speak English at home,” a staggering number that has doubled in the last ten years.

This is a reversal from the pride in the language that was once a hallmark of achievement to many migrants.

The Center For Immigration Studies discovered that “As a share of the population, 21.8 percent of U.S. residents speak a foreign language at home — roughly double the 11 percent in 1980.” While many cultural experts would not expect a people to give up their entire culture when coming to the U.S., those same pundits could recall a time when learning English was part of the pride of being American.

If so, that pride appears to some people to be falling away. After all, the Center said, “In America’s five largest cities, 48 percent of residents now speak a language other than English at home. In New York City and Houston it is 49 percent; in Los Angeles it is 59 percent; in Chicago, it is 36 percent, and in Phoenix it is 38 percent.”

For those inclined to feel that such issues don’t matter, last May, a man in New York “threatened to call immigration police if employees and customers didn’t stop speaking English in a restaurant.” Likewise, in Florida, at a Taco Bell, a customer has turned away because no one working there spoke English enough to take the order.

As for the abovementioned “pride” in the language and what it represents, the study found that “In 2017, a record 66.6 million U.S. residents (native-born, legal immigrants, and illegal immigrants) ages five and older spoke a language other than English at home. The number has more than doubled since 1990, and almost tripled since 1980.”

Yet another finding revealed that “Of those who speak a foreign language at home, 25.9 million (39 percent) told the Census Bureau that they speak English less than very well. This figure is entirely based on the opinion of the respondent; the Census Bureau does not measure language skills (a full list of findings listed below). This would imply to some people that there isn’t an attempt being made to embrace and learn the language.

It is established that “in rural areas outside of metropolitan areas just 8 percent speak a language other than English at home,” but this means only certain areas of the nation are fully embracing what author and radio talk show host Michael Savage called the importance of “borders, language, and culture.”

If the pride in what it means to be American, in tandem with the melting pot ideals of the nations, does not return, then it won’t be long before America looks (and sounds) much more divided than it ever did before, just as many historians have warned.

A full list of the findings:

  • In 2017, a record 66.6 million U.S. residents (native-born, legal immigrants, and illegal immigrants) ages five and older spoke a language other than English at home. The number has more than doubled since 1990, and almost tripled since 1980.
  • As a share of the population, 21.8 percent of U.S. residents speak a foreign language at home — roughly double the 11 percent in 1980.
  • In America’s five largest cities, 48 percent of residents now speak a language other than English at home. In New York City and Houston it is 49 percent; in Los Angeles it is 59 percent; in Chicago it is 36 percent; and in Phoenix it is 38 percent.
  • In 2017, there were 85 cities and Census Designated Places (CDP) in which a majority of residents spoke a foreign language at home. These include Hialeah, Fla. (95 percent); Laredo, Texas (92 percent); and East Los Angeles, Calif. (90 percent). Perhaps more surprisingly, it also includes places like Elizabeth, N.J. (76 percent); Skokie, Ill. (56 percent); and Germantown, Md., and Bridgeport, Conn. (each 51 percent).
  • Nearly one in five U.S. residents now lives in a city or CDP in which one-third of the population speaks a foreign language at home. This includes Dale City, Va. (43 percent); Norwalk, Conn., and New Rochelle, N.Y. (each 42 percent); and Aurora, Colo., and Troy, Mich. (each 35 percent).
  • In contrast to many of the nation’s cities, in rural areas outside of metropolitan areas just 8 percent speak a language other than English at home.
  • The data released thus far indicates that nationally nearly one in four public school students now speaks a language other than English at home.3 In California, 44 percent of school-age (5-17) children speak a foreign language at home, and it’s roughly one-third in Texas, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, and Florida.
  • Of school-age children (5-17) who speak a foreign language at home, 85 percent were born in the United States. Even among adults 18 and older, more than one-third of those who speak a foreign language at home are U.S.-born.
  • Of those who speak a foreign language at home, 25.9 million (39 percent) told the Census Bureau that they speak English less than very well. This figure is entirely based on the opinion of the respondent; the Census Bureau does not measure language skills.