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Henderson County, Tennessee Mayor refuses to remove a Bible verse engraving on the Courthouse, despite attacks from atheist group. He says he'll add another verse.

Henderson County, Tennessee Mayor refuses to remove a Bible verse engraving on the Courthouse, despite attacks from atheist group. He says he’ll add another verse.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) has set its sights in Henderson County, Tennessee. The founders of the atheist group are “alarmed” that the county courthouse sports a small plaque with a scripture from the Bible. They are sticking their nose into something that’s none of their business, and have discovered that Tennessee officials are much harder to intimidate than those in other states, where their threats have been successful.

The non-controversy started when one of the whopping 250 members of FFRF in Tennessee noticed an inscription gracing the Henderson County Courthouse. It reads, “Justice and judgment are the habitation of thy throne: Mercy and truth shall go before thy face. Psalms 89:14.” Apparently, that verse terrifies non-believers. The FFRF contacted Mayor Dan Hughes demanding that the marker be removed.

Rebecca Markert, activist attorney for the Foundation said that a resident contacted the group and asked that a complaint be lodged. All it takes is one disgruntled sinner, and more than two centuries of history is attacked.

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Mayor Dan Hughes refuses to bow to out-of-state activists over the half-century old marker. He says the community is Christian and everyone wants it to stay.

Mayor Dan Hughes refuses to bow to out-of-state activists over the half-century old marker. He says the community is Christian and everyone wants it to stay.

Hughes told reporters that he was surprised to receive the letter from FFRF last month. The verse has been engraved on the building for over 50 years.

“I wasn’t expecting anything and had not been contacted about the verse or really believed half the people in county even knew the verse was on that side of the cornerstone,” Hughes said.

Markert argued that the inscription violates the U.S. Constitution’s Establishment Clause. She added that it is “inappropriate” because “it conveys government support for religion.” She urged Hughes to remove the verse “as soon as possible.”

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The Freedom From religion Foundation claims that the country wasn't founded on Judeo-Christian laws, but they obviously haven't read who issues their rights.

The Freedom From religion Foundation claims that the country wasn’t founded on Judaeo-Christian laws, but they obviously haven’t read who issues their rights.

 

However, residents in the Great State of Tennessee don’t cotton to having a bunch of godless activists orchestrate their county’s markers. Hughes responded that the community was a Christian one, and that it is based “on the belief of a true and living God.”

Of course, that enraged the atheist group. They fired back that the population’s beliefs don’t matter. Everyone in the town should be forced to abide by the First Amendment. Yet, the First Amendment guarantees the right to free speech. Therefore, wouldn’t it be within the county’s rights to display such a sentiment?

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However, FFRF works for the enemy of everything that is righteous/ The group wants to remove every vestige of truth from the land blessed by Providence.

The atheists also argue that U.S. laws aren’t based on Judaeo-Christian morals, and that the engraving is particularly disturbing because it promotes that concept. People this stupid shouldn’t have any say so in trying to enforce federal legislation. Especially, if they deny logic and facts.

There’s absolutely no doubt that the United States was founded as a Christian nation. Non-believer activists have spent millions of dollars trying to debunk the truth, and have dug up a few documents that support a separation of church and state. However the Declaration of Independence, which is the basis for American freedom, clearly states that all rights are derived from the Almighty “Creator” God.

Residents agree with their mayor’s decision. John Huffman said, “It ought to stay right there. If somebody else wants something different, they’ll chisel it on there. There’s plenty of squares.”

Adam Pinte, another Henderson County resident said, “It’s a big Bible Belt around here, and you know, if they don’t like it, they don’t have to read it.”

The community has overwhelmingly supported their Mayor. He intends to add another scripture to the building.

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The community has overwhelmingly supported their Mayor. He intends to add another scripture to the building.

Wondering where the line would be drawn against religion, Pinte added, “Well, it’s on the back of your dollar bill too, but nobody complains when they spend their money.”

In fact, Mayor Hughes has met with overwhelmingly positive feedback for his resistance to the atheist group. Markert said FFRF is “alarmed” by the Mayor’s stance, and the group is planning to send another letter, threatening legal action against the county. However, Hughes is sticking to his guns.

The Mayor actually wants to place another engraving with Psalms 33:12, “Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD: and the people whom he hath chosen for his own inheritance.”

Having a bible verse on the courthouse does not impose religious beliefs of others. This attempt by the FFRF is simply a stunt to gain attention to a debate that doesn’t concern anyone but the people who hate God.