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About 50,000 North Koreans laborers are working low-paying jobs in Russia, sending at least $120 million every year to Kim Jong Un´s regime in Pyongyang.

About 50,000 North Koreans laborers are working low-paying jobs in Russia, sending at least $120 million every year to Kim Jong Un’s regime in Pyongyang.

Kim Jong Un is known for being one of the craziest dictators in the history, given the fact that while the North Korean regime has been characterized for being tragicomic and dystopian, he has contributed to eternize its dark condition and imminent threat.

However, even when everyone knows that the acts of this kind of despots have no limits, he recently went too far with an action that perfectly describes the atrocious way of how communism utilizes its own people in despicable forms.

Believe it or not, the North Korean dictator shipped tens of thousands of impoverished citizens to Russia since the cash-strapped regime desperately needs hard currency. Human rights groups assured that North Korea workers in Russia are little more than slaves, given the fact they are subjected to everything from ruthless exploitations at the hands of corrupt officials to cruel and violent acts.

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According to the director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy at the Council of Foreign Relations Scott Synder, the way the regime maintains a strict control over their worker´s profits is a terrible issue that has been going on for a long time.

According to the director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy at the Council of Foreign Relations Scott Synder, the way the regime maintains a strict control over their worker´s profits is a terrible issue that has been going on for a long time.

Apparently, these people are even being forced to turn over large chunks of their pay to Kim Jong Un’s regime. According to a Seoul-based Data Base Center for North Korean Human Rights, those who the dictatorship put to work in Russia are paid approximately 50,000 rubles per month, which represents less than $850.

This Data Base Center also estimates that about 50,000 North Koreans laborers are working low-paying jobs in Russia, sending at least $120 million every year to Kim Jong Un’s regime in Pyongyang. Apparently, half of the money the workers make is confiscated by a minder from the ruling Worker’s Party of Korea and a construction chief takes another 20 percent.

According to the director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy at the Council of Foreign Relations  Scott Synder, the way the regime maintains a strict control over their worker’s profits is a terrible issue that has been going on for a long time.

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Given the economic crisis this country has faced under the Kim communist dynasty, Russia has taken advantage of this situation and used North Koreans as slaves for their own interest.

Given the economic crisis this country has faced under the Kim communist dynasty, Russia has taken advantage of this situation and used North Koreans as slaves for their own interest.

Given the economic crisis this country has faced under the Kim communist dynasty, Russia has taken advantage of this situation and used North Koreans as slaves for their own interest. Basically, this is an inhuman operation where both governments win, to the detriment of the people who not only ends up working in the worst conditions, but are also forced to return to North Korea once they finish their job

One of the best examples is the construction of the new soccer stadium in St. Petersburg, which will host some matches for the World Cup that will be celebrated in Russia next year. This stadium, along with a luxury apartment complex in Moscow, were made by North Koreans workers under slavery conditions.

Apparently, one of the workers of the soccer project was killed, and two others were found dead in June at a decrepit hostel near the apartment building site in Moscow. So far, the details regarding these deaths remain unknown, and many expect that authorities won’t get their eyes deep into these cases considering the strong ties between Kim Jong Un And Vladimir Putin’s regimes.

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The new St. Petersburg stadium, along with a luxury apartment complex in Moscow, were made by North Koreans workers under slavery conditions.

The new St. Petersburg stadium, along with a luxury apartment complex in Moscow, were made by North Koreans workers under slavery conditions.

For years, North Korean workers laborers have decided to work at remote Russian logging camps which resemble the brutal Soviet-era Gulag system. Nevertheless, the political control, the brutal repression and the economic crisis is so terrible that North Korean workers are willing to pay bribes to sent to Russia and be treated like slaves.

Among the exploited North Korean workers there are also painters that are sent to the Pacific Ocean port of Vladivostok, which have it little better than those working in the Russian logging camps.

According to The New York Times, the boss of a decorating company in this port explained that these workers are also in the situation of slaves since they only eat, work and sleep a little bit without taking any kind of holidays.

Last month, the U.S. State Department issued a report on human trafficking that determined that North Korean workers in Russia were subjected to exploitative labor conditions that are clear characteristics of trafficking cases. These include non-payment for services rendered, lack of safety measures, withholding of identity documents, extreme poor living conditions and physical abuse.

In order to solve this unspeakable situation, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has proposed new sanctions to deal with this issue. According to a State Department official, he has called on all nations to fully implement all U.N. Security Council resolutions, downgrade diplomatic relations and isolate North Korea financially.

The reason why he’s making such international moves is because this terrible situation with North Korean workers not only happens in Russia, but also in Qatar and especially China, which uses large numbers of them.