Clinton Uranium Docs

PUBLISHED: 7:51 PM 2 Oct 2018
UPDATED: 10:20 PM 2 Oct 2018

FBI Withholds ‘Secret’ Records In Quiet Uranium One FOIA Release

The FBI published Uranium One records but held back 37 pages. Network media are only telling the part of the story that everyone already knows.

“At the heart of the tale are several men, leaders of the Canadian mining industry, who have been major donors to the charitable endeavors of former President Bill Clinton and his family. Members of that group built, financed and eventually sold off to the Russians a company that would become known as Uranium One.”

Nearly a decade ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation planted an informant inside the Russian nuclear industry and recently “found” 37 pages of related assessment memos that they’re desperately fighting to keep secret.

The records could solidly implicate the Clinton’s and their foundation in Uranium One corruption, along with high ranking advisers to Barack Obama. These ‘spy’ memos, from a plant inside Rosatom could be another link in the chain that leads to shackles and handcuffs.

The bribery, money laundering and other crimes have already been proven in court. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was the prosecutor credited with securing the convictions. The real question is why did the FBI and the Department of Justice keep the investigation going for nearly ten years, when they had all the evidence they needed to convict in 2010?

Insiders hope the missing pages spell out exactly what investigating agents told the Obama administration, particularly Hillary Clinton, who was Secretary of State at the time, about what crimes were uncovered. President Donald Trump has the authority to release them.

President Trump’s administration created an “online vault” where items responsive to Freedom of Information Act requests are publicly posted, making the records available to anyone. The FBI very quietly uploaded a folder recently, titled “Uranium One Transaction,” without any fanfare, as if they were hoping nobody would notice it was there.

Along with a handful of already public letters from lawmakers demanding Uranium One answers, was a “declaration” and a “list of withheld documents,” The Hill reports.

The Hill makes the contents seem dull and dreary but wait, there’s more!

First, those “already public letters from lawmakers” include a December 21, 2010 letter to then-President Barack Obama from Senator John Barrasso (R-Wy.). He outlined his concerns to the President over “the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) recent decision to approve the sale of American uranium reserves to Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ).”

“ARMZ is owned by the Russian government and has sought to acquire a controlling stake in the Canadian owned Uranium One, Inc. This transaction would give the Russian government control over a sizable portion of America’s uranium production capacity. Equally alarming, this sale gives ARMZ a significant stake in uranium mines in Kazakhstan.”

Another thing in the vault file that the Hill does not mention is the image of the paper printout of a New York Times news article from April, 2015. The FBI chose not to disclose the entire article. The document begins with the sentence fragment, “composed of representatives from a number of United States government agencies.”

The full article “Cash Flowed to Clinton Foundation Amid Russian Uranium Deal” is still available online.

Looking at the missing first page, it echoes the concerns of Senator Barrasso, with some additional information. For instance, the Times cites January, 2013, “headline on the website Pravda.”

“Pravda trumpeted President Vladimir V. Putin’s latest coup, its nationalistic fervor recalling an era when its precursor served as the official mouthpiece of the Kremlin: ‘Russian Nuclear Energy Conquers the World.’”

The Times noted the article “detailed how the Russian atomic energy agency, Rosatom, had taken over a Canadian company with uranium-mining stakes stretching from Central Asia to the American West. The deal made Rosatom one of the world’s largest uranium producers and brought Mr. Putin closer to his goal of controlling much of the global uranium supply chain.”

“But the untold story,” the Times tells, “is one that involves not just the Russian president, but also a former American president and a woman who would like to be the next one.”

“At the heart of the tale are several men, leaders of the Canadian mining industry, who have been major donors to the charitable endeavors of former President Bill Clinton and his family. Members of that group built, financed and eventually sold off to the Russians a company that would become known as Uranium One.”

“Beyond the mines in Kazakhstan that are among the most lucrative in the world, the sale gave the Russians control of one-fifth of all uranium production capacity in the United States. Since uranium is considered a strategic asset with implications for national security, the deal had to be approved by a committee composed of representatives from a number of United States government agencies.”

One can only speculate why the FBI would want to leave that page out, or why The Hill would neglect to tell the public about it at all.

In 2009, before the Uranium One sale was approved, William Campbell penetrated Rosatom as a consultant and official FBI informant. He gathered “extensive evidence” which he passed to his FBI handlers prior to early 2010, “that Rosatom’s main executive in the United States, Vadim Mikerin, orchestrated a racketeering plot involving kickbacks, bribes and extortion that corrupted the main uranium trucking company in the United States,” as the Hill relates.

As that was happening, Hillary Clinton was cuddling up to the Kremlin. Bill Clinton pocketed $500,000 for a single speech in Moscow, and the Rosatom sale was approved.

Conservatives across the nation are on the edge of their seats waiting to learn if the FBI officially notified Obama, Hillary Clinton or anyone on the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, about the crimes of Rosatom executives before the sale was approved, or did the FBI make a huge blunder and “drop the ball,” failing to tell the honchos.

So far, the excuses the FBI have been using for not divulging the 37 totally secret pages are their standard boilerplate. Releasing the truth would violate “national security and law enforcement techniques” that are necessary to guard “the privacy of individual Americans and the ability of agencies to communicate with each other,” The Hill reports.

That’s exactly the same thing they said when they didn’t want to turn over the Russia collusion probe records that President Donald Trump just declassified.

They also didn’t want the world to see the “methods” they were using like “former FBI agent Peter Strzok’s ‘stop Trump’ texts.” They used that excuse to hide the fact that Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee funded Christopher Steele’s infamous dossier.