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Betsy DeVos and the Department of Education took up the challenge and found six dozen ready to be slashed.

Betsy DeVos took up the challenge and found six dozen regs ready to be slashed.

Following President Trump’s directive to identify and weed out regulations that do nothing more than burden the system, the Department of Education announced 72 such useless documents have been rescinded and purged. Outdated forms and guidelines dating back to the 1980s were stripped earlier this month according to the Offices of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, who announced the October 2nd move in Friday’s newsletter.

When President Trump took office, as part of his plan to drain the swamp, he called for all government administrators in every department to look for ways we can “lower regulatory burdens on the American people.” Betsy DeVos and the Department of Education took up the challenge and found six dozen ready to be slashed.

All the materials are related to a pair of federal laws, the Rehabilitation Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The laws themselves are still in force but the DOE found several supporting documents that fall into the general categories of “outdated, unnecessary, or ineffective.”

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63 of the documents originated from the Office of Special Education Programs and the rest from the Rehabilitation Services Administration. Before cutting anything, the department sought outside comments and held a hearing. Numerous disability rights groups and education advocates were involved in the hearing process.

President Trump called for all government administrators to look for ways to “lower regulatory burdens on the American people.”

President Trump called for all government administrators to look for ways to “lower regulatory burdens on the American people.”

The biggest impact comes from revoking specific restrictions on how individual schools can spend their special education allotments. By pulling nit-picking restrictions imposed during the Obama era, schools are now free to spend their special-ed dollars as they see fit.

Washington liberals are tripping over themselves trying to find something bad to say about the move. If Trump ordered it and Betsy DeVos did it, then it has to be bad. So far, they come up empty-handed, confirming a DOE statement that “students with disabilities and their advocates will see no impact on services provided.”

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Lindsay Jones, chief of policy and advocacy officer at the National Center for Learning disabilities is still going over everything with a fine tooth comb for something to complain about. So far, the best she can come up with is, “all of these are meant to be very useful in helping schools and parents understand and fill in with concrete examples the way the law is meant to work when it’s being implemented in various situations.”

Students with disabilities and their advocates will see no impact on services provided.

Students with disabilities and their advocates will see no impact on services provided.

Rep. Robert C. “Bobby” Scott, (D-Va.) jumped on the bandwagon and whined about the “latest in a series of disturbing actions taken by the Trump Administration to undermine civil rights for vulnerable Americans.” The trim “undermines” their rights, he insists, by removing clarifications. “Much of the guidance around the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act focused on critical clarifications of the regulations required to meet the needs of students with disabilities and provide them a free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment,” Scott objects.

Even Scott knows he is on shaky ground with his spurious accusations because none of the guidelines ever had any legal effect. “Notwithstanding the actions taken by the Department today, the regulations still remained enforced, however, they lack the clarification the guidance provided,” he admits.

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The specific document he is referring to is “Questions and Answers on Serving Children with Disabilities Placed by Their Parents at Private Schools.” He says its main benefit was to translate “the legal jargon into plain English for parents advocating for their children.” The department of education specifically says the reason for shelving the 2006 guide is because there is a new one that was put out in 2011.

The federal government has no business in what is essentially a state’s rights issue.

The federal government has no business in what is essentially a state’s rights issue.

Liberals are still fuming over the order issued by DOE Secretary DeVos in February which removed directives burdening schools with providing transgender bathrooms. That decision was made after assessing correctly that the federal government has no business in what is essentially a state’s rights issue. Last month, DeVos again angered the snowflakes by throwing out more Obama inspired restrictions on sexual assault investigations that totally disregarded the Defendant’s civil rights.

Ms. Jones concedes that updating documents this way is nothing new or unusual and that new administrations commonly do the same thing. “If the documents that are on this list are all covered in newer documents that were released, which sometimes does happen, that would be fine. Our goal is to make sure that parents and schools and educators understand how these laws work and the department plays a critical role in that.”