PUBLISHED: 5:25 AM 27 Jan 2018
UPDATED: 9:54 PM 27 Jan 2018

180 Sign Non-Disclosure, Obama Action Clear As Lawmaker Says “Pitchforks And Torches” WILL Get Go Ahead

Devin Nunes is the man to thank for the memo being made available to Congress.

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Devin Nunes is the man to thank for the memo being made available to Congress.

According to Rep. George Holding (R-NC), anyone reading the classified four-page catalog of Obama administration crimes, made available to lawmakers by the House Intelligence Committee, can see for themselves exactly how Obama officials abused the law by improperly spying on the Trump campaign. So far, “180 out of 241 GOP members of the House have read the document” and quite a few Democrats have too. A steady stream of bipartisan lawmakers “has been visiting a secure room in the Capitol.”

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Congressmen are “required to sign a non-disclosure agreement before reading the four-page memo” that spells out “FISA abuse,” reports the Washington Examiner, also pointing out that there “is an extraordinary level of interest,” especially considering “there is a government shutdown going on.” When they come out, lawmakers “have been both extravagant in their expressions of astonishment and tight-lipped in their discussions of what is actually in the memo.”

“I can’t say anything about what’s in the memo but I think anyone reading this would quickly understand that the process was abused,” Holding insists. You will soon get to read it for yourself. Plans are already in progress to declassify the report. “It’s amazing what the pitchforks and the torches will do,” said another lawmaker.

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It looks like President Trump gets to say “I told you so.” Almost a year ago he tweeted, “terrible! Just found out that Obama had my “wires tapped” in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!”

Rep. Holding is intimately familiar with Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act paperwork. Before elected to Congress, Holding was the U.S. Attorney for North Carolina and frequently worked on FISA related cases. “Having read the memo I was shocked, absolutely shocked — shocked and disappointed,” he proclaimed.

It’s amazing what the pitchforks and the torches will do.

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As reported last week by Conservative Daily Post, “According to a military and intelligence analyst who previously served as a deputy assistant to President Trump, ‘the DOJ and the highest level of the FBI were politicized as weapons by the Obama administration.’ The order to pull the trigger may have been issued by Former-President Obama personally.” Dr. Sebastian Gorka asks, “was it perhaps Obama himself that used the intelligence community as a political weapon?” Gorka also adds, “what happened under the last eight years means that nobody is safe. When Obama was in charge, they used the intelligence community and law enforcement to target people that they politically disagreed with.”

The public has been clamoring for answers with “#releasethememo” going viral on Twitter. Echoing calls from patriotic conservatives on every other social media platform have legislators across America paying close attention.

The report was compiled from information recently gathered in a series of closed-door interrogations of high-ranking FBI and Justice Department officials. Two separate committees have been investigating Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s witch hunt into non-existent Trump-Russia collusion.

Was it perhaps Obama himself that used the intelligence community as a political weapon?

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Based on what has already leaked to the press, improper wiretaps and other abuses of government surveillance powers probably occurred, justified by fantasies contained in a fictional file put together by Christopher Steele and paid for by Hillary’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee. “Republicans have long asked whether the Obama Justice Department improperly used unverified information from the dossier — financed and produced by the Hillary Clinton campaign — to spy on one or more persons associated with the Trump campaign,” The Washington Examiner explains.

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Now that the lawmakers have had a chance to get an eyeful, Devin Nunes, who heads the Intelligence Committee held a meeting Saturday with Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte and Chair of the Oversight Committee, Trey Gowdy to “chart a path forward.”

After putting their heads together, the Republican watchdogs “are studying a never-before-used procedure whereby House Intelligence Committee members would vote to make the memo public.” Nunes is the man to thank for the memo being made available to Congress. The Chairman was convinced “he has already seen enough proof to declare that Obama’s Justice Department ‘abused the surveillance program” and decided to give the rest of Congress access to the same documents he had seen.

Fox News weighed in on the story last week, reporting, “Nunes told Republican colleagues in two closed-door meetings this week he has seen evidence that shows clear ‘abuse’ of government surveillance programs by FBI and Justice Department officials, according to three sources familiar with the conversations, raising more questions about whether the controversial anti-Trump dossier was used by the Obama administration to authorize surveillance of advisers to President Trump.”

Improper wiretaps and other abuses of government surveillance powers.

Republicans hold the majority in the Intelligence Committee, so the measure to declassify the document should easily pass. After that, “the president would have five days to object.” There is little chance that President Trump would “object to the release of a document allegedly showing that Obama administration officials abused the law.”

Assuming the president does not object, the memo can be in the hands of the public five days later. If for some strange reason, the president did veto the deal, it would get kicked back to “the full House.” If it comes to that there is more than enough support to “overrule the president’s objections and release the memo anyway.” If all goes well, “the entire process could take two to three weeks.”